Comparing the executive function of patients with schizophrenia, acute/chronic type I disorder (manic episode), and healthy controls on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Continuous Performance Test

AUTHORS

Hossein Zare 1 , Samira Hassanzadeh Pashang 1 , * , Afshin Sabery 1

1 Dept. of Psychology, Payame Noor University, Tehran, Iran

How to Cite: Zare H, Hassanzadeh Pashang S, Sabery A. Comparing the executive function of patients with schizophrenia, acute/chronic type I disorder (manic episode), and healthy controls on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Continuous Performance Test, J Kermanshah Univ Med Sci. 2017 ; 21(1):e69505. doi: 10.22110/jkums.v21i1.3104.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: 21 (1); e69505
Published Online: May 30, 2018
Article Type: Original Article
Received: January 04, 2017
Accepted: April 18, 2017
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Abstract

Introduction: From among various cognitive deficits, deficits in executive processes have an effective role in limiting the patients’ ability to retain, acquire, and re-learn the skills necessary for real-life performance. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the executive function of patients with schizophrenia, acute/chronic type I disorder, and the healthy group.

Methods: The present research was an analytical-comparative study. The statistical population consisted of all the outpatients and inpatients with acute/chronic schizophrenia and acute/chronic type I disorder (manic episode) visiting Shafa Psychiatric Hospital, Rasht, Iran. Using convenience sampling, 60 male subjects aging 18-49 years old were selected in 2014-2015. They were matched for the variables of sex, age, and education level. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Continuous Performance Test, and Raven’s Progressive Matrices were administered, and the data were analyzed using MANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test.

Results: A significant difference was observed between the acute/chronic schizophrenia group, acute/chronic type I disorder (manic episode), and healthy group on the two tests. Patients with schizophrenia had a weaker executive function and attention deficit compared to those with type I disorder and the healthy group (P£0.05).

Conclusion: Both schizophrenia and type I disorder patients show deficits in executive function and attention. However, the former group manifests higher impairment in cognitive activities, concept formation, cognitive flexibility, and attention deficit.

Keywords

Schizophrenia type I disorder executive function Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Continuous Performance Test

© 2017, Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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