Physiological evidence for perceptive difference of native and second language emotional words among bilinguals

AUTHORS

Mansur Bayrami 1 , Hasan Ashayeri 2 , Yahya Modarresi 3 , Abbas Bakhshipur 1 , Hashem Farhangdoost 1 , *

1 Dept. of Psychology, School of Psychology, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran

2 Dept. of Neurology, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

3 Dept. of Linguistics, Human Sciences and Cultural Education Institute, Tehran, Iran

How to Cite: Bayrami M, Ashayeri H, Modarresi Y, Bakhshipur A, Farhangdoost H. Physiological evidence for perceptive difference of native and second language emotional words among bilinguals , J Kermanshah Univ Med Sci. 2012 ; 16(5):e77356.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: 16 (5); e77356
Published Online: December 29, 2012
Article Type: Research Article
Received: November 01, 2011
Accepted: January 17, 2012

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Abstract

Background: Bilingual individuals reported that they experience more intensive emotions in native language. This study tries to investigate this claim psychophysiologicaly. The effect of age and second language acquisition context on physiological appearances of first and second languages were also investigated.

 Methods: 60Turkish and Kurdish bilinguals were explored. The emotional stimuli employed in this study were composed of words and phrases indicating anger (insult and curse) and words and phrases indicating affections and admiration. The heart rate of participants was recorded by a biofeedback system during hearing of emotional words in two languages during three phases of base, happiness and anger. The collected data analyzed using Repeated Measures of ANOVA.

Results: The Findings demonstrated that in both Turkish and Kurdish bilinguals, hearing  phrases indicating anger (insults and curse) in native language produces more acceleration in heart rate than hearing them in second language, and hearing endearment phrases (happy) in native language increased more heart rate than hearing them in second language.

Conclusion: Heart rate recording is a useable and sensitive method for studying psycho physiological correlations of language.

 Physiological appearances of encountering with auditory words and phrases in native and second languages were significantly different, and this indicated that, in early successive bilinguals, native language has more emotional intensity.

Keywords

bilingual emotion heart rate

© 2012, Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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